Q.

What does “Catch Weight” mean?

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A.

Catch Weight is a food industry term that means “approximate weight”. Because unprocessed food products (particularly meats) naturally vary in size, most food sold by the case is sold by catch weight. The actual weight may be slightly more or less than what is displayed on the MarxFoods webstore.

For example, let’s say Kobe beef tenderloins are described on the site as coming in “a two tenderloin case weighing approximately 10lbs.” Though the case will always contain two Kobe tenderloins, the actual weight could be something like 9.2 lbs or 10.5 pounds depending on the size of the tenderloins inside.

Catch weight is one of the realities of shopping from the same supply fine dining chefs use. It’s sort of like a lottery. Occasionally you may end with an “approximately 10lb case” that actually weighs slightly less. Chances are, the next time you order that item, you may get a case that weighs more for the same price. Lucky day!

In any event, if you are unhappy with the weight of the case you received, please contact us immediately and we’ll do what we can to make you happy.

catch-weight




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4 Responses to “What does “Catch Weight” mean?”

  1. 1
    Mary Shaw says:

    Is is acceptable to refuse delivery on a catch weight item if the amount exceeds the order and approved PO amount for the order?

  2. 2
    Matthew says:

    Hi Mary,

    It depends on a lot of factors including the prior course of business between the buyer and seller, the industry, and the degree to which the delivered amount exceeds the PO.

    Generally, it is assumed with catch weights that there will be variability and the buyer should accept and pay for reasonable overages if the sale price is not fixed, but is variable and based on quantity.

    I hope this helps!

    Matthew
    Marx Foods

  3. 3
    Kemal says:

    In poultry processing, can you set a max limit on the label and still call it catch weight or would it be called net weight at that point?

  4. 4
    Matthew says:

    Hi Kemal,

    “Net Weight” refers to the weight of the actual product (i.e. pack weight minus weight of the packaging). If the actual weight of product can vary below the maximum, you would still be in a catch weight situation.

    It’s worth noting that, if you’re talking about poultry being processed for individual pack sales to consumers at a grocery store, the USDA requires the actual weight of each pack be printed on all retail labeling at time of sale.

    Products sold by the case (typically within the context of foodservice distribution) are subject to different regulations.

    I hope that helps!

    Matthew
    Marx Foods