Q.

How hot is the Boonie pepper from Guam and Tinian? Do you have recipes for it?

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A.

We’re not familiar with the Boonie pepper.  A quick internet search seems to indicate that it’s a Guam relative of SE Asian birdseye chilies (possibly even the same variety) that is typically sold dried.  People seem to think that is notably hotter than the birdseye because of the climate & soil in which it’s grown.

Assuming all of the above is reliably true, it might be hotter than our dried birdseye chilies (which are themselves quite hot – around 160,000 scoville units).

We don’t have any recipes specifically for Boonie peppers, but we do have a large collection of dried chile recipes & techniques that can be adapted to use other varieties, like the Boonie, as long as you take their heat level into account relative to the ones in the original recipe.

– Question Submitted by Elana T.




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2 Responses to “How hot is the Boonie pepper from Guam and Tinian? Do you have recipes for it?”

  1. 1
    fdkay says:

    The boonie pepper is native to the Philippines.
    It is hotter than a birds eye pepper.
    One of the names, from the Philippines is “chileng bundok” which, literally translated, means wild chile.

    Bundock is actually a native Philipino word they use to reference the jungle or other wild areas. It was picked up by the GI’s during the occupation after the Spanish American War. There are other names for the same plant in the Philippines, many of which revolve around the word “Siling”. There are around 80 dialects spoken there, so there are several variations.

    As noted, they are very hot but also very flavorful. I use them regularly when making chili and add them to anything one would normally add jalapeno’s or pepper flakes to.

  2. 2
    Matthew says:

    Thank you so much for all the additional information fdkay. I really appreciate you sharing your knowledge!

    Matthew
    Marxfoods