Q.

Are the boars wild in the country or farm raised?

A.

Our wild boar meat is all completely wild – humanely trapped in Texas hill country, then processed in a USDA-inspected facility.  Not only is it lean and delicious, but because they’re invasive (and rather destructive), you’re actually helping the environment
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Q.

Can quahogs shrink after harvest?

A.

I haven’t been able to find any references to quahogs shrinking post harvest, nor is clam harvesting my area of expertise, so I’m not sure. I doubt it’s possible for the shell to shrink, but I could see the quahog
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Q.

What is the function of lean ground meat in the clearmeat for consomme?

A.

The lean ground meat traditionally added to clearmeat mixtures for consomme is used to fortify the flavor of the stock. Typically chefs use the same species of meat as the stock – i.e. ground chicken with chicken stock, veal with
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Q.

What is irradiation? Why do it to food?

A.

Irradiation is exposing something to radiation.  It’s sometimes used as a preservative method for certain foods to sterilize them, prevent agricultural parasites (insects, spores, etc), inhibit growth (ripening/sprouting) post harvest, etc. The first patents for irradiating food were actually issued
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Q.

What bread rolls make a good pulled pork sandwich?

A.

Pulled pork sandwiches tend to be served on soft rolls – burger buns, potato rolls, etc.  There’s a wide variety of options – you just don’t want them to compete with the pork’s flavor, take effort to bite away from
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Q.

What is Farro?

A.

This is actually a more complicated question than it first appears.  Because the word “farro” in Italian has a vague meaning (often translated as “a kind of wheat”), the term can refer to multiple types of grain, typically heirloom varieties
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Q.

What are gougeres?

A.

Gougeres are cheese puffs (though that name doesn’t do them justice). Imagine the pastry part of cream puffs or eclairs (i.e. no cream and no caramel or chocolate topping) made savory instead of sweet and (typically) flavored with gruyere or
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Q.

How do you prep & sear foie gras?

A.

Selecting Foie Gras The foie grade you select is important as different grades are suited to different applications: Grade A foie is the best choice for searing because it’s firmer, larger, and better looking. Grade B can also be used
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Q.

How can I get better results when freezing leftover salmon?

A.

Commercial blast freezers freeze foods extremely quickly, which results in smaller ice crystals, better protecting their flavor and texture. If you’re planning on storing wild salmon frozen, the best practice is to buy it already commercially frozen and use your
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Q.

Why do we call it chicken juice? Isn’t it really blood?

A.

I’m assuming you’re referring to the liquid that comes from cooked chicken when cut or tested for doneness (the phrase “when the juices run clear” is often used). This “juice” is actually primarily water.  As much blood as possible is
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Q.

How do I use jarred summer truffles in truffle juice with pasta?

A.

The truffle juice will hopefully help infuse the jarred truffles with more flavor than they’d normally have (they really don’t like canning temperatures). But I would have a finishing truffle product on hand (a black truffle oil – all natural
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Q.

What does “blind bake” mean?

A.

“Blind baking” is a pastry chef/baker’s term that refers to baking a pie or tart crust before adding filling. Blind baking is typically done when the filling is cooked separately (for example, cream pies, ganache tarts, or custard tarts) or
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Q.

What is onion brulee?

A.

Onion brulee (brulé) translates to “burnt onion”. Charred onions are sometimes used as a natural colorant by chefs looking to darken soups, stocks (beef or veal stock), or sauces.  Chefs typically roast bones (often with tomato paste – caramelizing its
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Q.

What’s the difference between steak rolls and semolina rolls?

A.

We don’t have “steak rolls” here on the West Coast, but after doing a little research it looks like the term refers to a soft hoagie-style roll/bun for long narrow sandwiches. “Semolina,” refers to a type of coarsely ground grain
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Q.

How do I convert dried onions to fresh onions?

A.

Typically the manufacturer will recommend a conversion on the packaging, and that’s the one I’d follow.  They know their product.  Estimates I’m seeing online suggest converting dried onions by volume at 1-2 tablespoons of dried per 1/4 cup of fresh
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